Doctors Used To Screen Immigrants Seeking Green Cards Include Dozens With History

first_img North Jersey Record: Advocates Fear ‘Chilling Effect’ From Trump Policy To Restrict Green Card Applicants The doctors tapped by the federal government to medically screen immigrants seeking green cards include dozens with a history of “egregious infractions,” according to a report from a federal watchdog agency. The report looked at more than 5,500 doctors across the country used by United States Citizenship and Immigration Services as of June 2017 to examine those seeking green cards. More than 130 had some background of wrongdoing, including one who sexually exploited female patients and another who tried to have a dissatisfied patient killed, the report said. (Zaveri, 9/26) The New York Times: Dozens Of Doctors Who Screen Immigrants Have Record Of ‘Egregious Infractions,’ Report Says A small Arizona city has ended its role in an unusual contract that allowed the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency to run a family detention center in Texas, where lawyers say a child became sick and died after her release. The city of Eloy already had an agreement with ICE and the private detention company CoreCivic for a detention facility when it entered the contract in 2014 involving the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley. (9/26) The Associated Press: Arizona City Ends Contract For Immigrant Detention Center Fewer New Jersey families are participating in federal nutrition and health programs, and New Jersey social service providers say they expect the numbers to continue to drop under a new Trump administration plan to deny green cards to immigrants who rely on public assistance. …The new rule, which the administration announced over the weekend, could affect about 382,000 people a year nationally, according to the Department of Homeland Security. (Alvarado and Solis, 9/26) In other news on immigration and health care — Doctors Used To Screen Immigrants Seeking Green Cards Include Dozens With History Of ‘Egregious Infractions’ The report released by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General found that the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services “is not properly vetting the physicians it designates to conduct required medical examinations of these foreign nationals, and it has designated physicians with a history of patient abuse or a criminal record.” This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

iPad Pro Price Crash Get over £200 off the latest iPad Pro

first_img Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Update: Prime Day might be over and done with, but that doesn’t mean you have to miss out on amazing offers in the future – just give us a follow @TrustedDeals to stay in the loop.In what might be the best Prime Day deal we’ve seen for an Apple product, Amazon currently has £234 off the excellent latest version of the iPad Pro.This particular deal is for the high-end 12.9-inch iPad Pro with both Wi-Fi and cellular connectivity (4G) and 64GB of storage. Normally this would set you back a wallet-crushing £1119, so this deal will save you some serious cash. Apple iPad Pro (12.9-inch, Wi-Fi and Cellular, 64GB)Apple iPad Pro (12.9-inch, Wi-Fi and Cellular, 64GB) – Space GreySave big with this excellent Apple iPad Pro deal. Act fast though, it’s not going to last for long!Amazon|Save £234|£885.00View Deal£885.00|Save £234|Amazon You will, of course, need to be an Amazon Prime member to get this deal and it’ll only last today (July 16).This is one of the best iPads around and thanks to the upcoming iPadOS software it comes very close to being able to properly replace your laptop. It packs a seriously powerful A12X Bionic chip, complete with AI neural engine, that’ll comfortably get the job done.The 12.9-inch display is gorgeous and super-responsive, there’s USB-C for charging and FaceID on the front for unlocking the iPad and authorising payments.In our 4/5 star review of the 2018 iPad Pro we said: “There’s plenty to like about the iPad Pro 2018. It’s a gorgeous piece of design headlined by a beautiful display and hardware that’s unmatched. Yet for the potential of this tablet to be fully realised, iOS needs to grow up. There are too many limitations, too many roadblocks to completing tasks in a streamlined way. Don’t get me wrong, you can be super-productive with this device, but it takes more effort than it should.” Apple iPad Pro (12.9-inch, Wi-Fi and Cellular, 64GB)Apple iPad Pro (12.9-inch, Wi-Fi and Cellular, 64GB) – Space GreySave big with this excellent Apple iPad Pro deal. Act fast though, it’s not going to last for long!Amazon|Save £234|£885.00View Deal£885.00|Save £234|Amazon Want to stay up to date with Amazon Prime Day 2019? We’ve got you covered. For more amazing offers, follow us @TrustedDealsUKWe may earn a commission if you click a deal and buy an item. That’s why we want to make sure you’re well-informed and happy with your purchase, so that you’ll continue to rely on us for your buying advice needs. Amazon Prime Day Dealscenter_img We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editor This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.last_img read more

Watch This 360Degree Video Of What Tesla Autopilot Sees

first_img Musk: New Version Of Tesla Summon Mode To Use Autopilot Cameras Not only is footage you see above generated using the eight cameras of the 2.5 version hardware needed for Autopilot in a Tesla vehicle — we’re not sure exactly which model is used here — it also offers a 360-degree view. This means you can pan around as the video plays and see all the angles that the system captures.The footage, which appeared on the Pranav Kodali YouTube channel, wasn’t taken from their car. Apparently, they used footage posted on the greentheonly YouTube channel which showed the different camera views separately. Clearly using magic, these individual streams were put together to create the mesmerizing video above. We’ve embedded the original clip below for your edification and amusement.According to the video description of the original poster, Autopilot was actually engaged up until about the 3:30 mark.  Then, the car went way over the line separating the lanes. The driver assistance system software is, of course, not intended for usage on this type of secondary road and we’re surprised it managed as well as it did up until that point.The original poster was asked how they gathered the stream and answered only, “Sorry, it’s not public for obvious reason that we still want them to continue working for as long as possible.” Enjoy!Video description:A visualization of the data eight autopilot cameras see when driving on the famous Tail of the Dragon course. Data for visualization was taken directly from an autopilot 2.5 car. Pan around for a full immersive experience. New Tesla Semi Video Shows 26 Cameras, Sleeper Also Coming Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 27, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }center_img Source: Electric Vehicle News This Video Reveals What Tesla Autopilot Actually Sees A mesmerizing trip down the TailThe Tail of the Dragon is touted as one of the best stretches of asphalt to drive in the United States. Over its 11 miles, it incorporates 318 turns as it winds through a mountain pass on the border of North Carolina and Tennessee. While there are hundreds, probably thousands, of videos of it on the internet, there are none quite like this.More from the cameras of Tesla Autopilotlast_img read more

Petro Canada starts deploying its own electric vehicle chargers at gas stations

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Petro Canada, formerly a state-owned oil company in Canada but now part of Suncor, becomes the latest oil company to get involved in electric vehicle charging.They are starting to deploy their own electric vehicle chargers at gas stations – and they are not kidding around when it comes to the charge rate. more…The post Petro Canada starts deploying its own electric vehicle chargers at gas stations appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Tesla Model S Versus Panamera AMG GT 63 M5 In Drag Race

first_imgThere’s a bit more to it than just power, however. This four-way race can also be construed as a contest between the past, present, and future in terms of powertrain choices. Representing the past are German rivals Mercedes-Benz and BMW, namely the Mercedes-AMG GT 63 S 4-Doorand the BMW M5 Competition. The Merc brings 640 hp (477 kW) to the line with its 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8, while the M5 brings up the rear with just 625 hp from its boosted 4.4-liter V8.If pure gasoline power is the past, the present must be a hybrid and that role is filled by the Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid. Like its German competitors, the Porsche delivers a twin-turbo V8 but it’s only rated to 550 hp (410 kW). An electric motor supplies the rest of the juice, giving the Panamera a whopping 680 hp (507 kW) to all four wheels. With a weight of over 2.5 tons, however, it’s not exactly light on its toes.The future is naturally an all-electric Tesla Model S P100D with its dual motors pumping out an insane amount of power to all four wheels. Horsepower is a harder to quantify on a purely electric vehicle, but Carwow lists the Tesla with 680 hp, matching the Porsche. It’s also a heavyweight at just under 5,000 pounds (2,268 kilograms), but it’s still a bit lighter than the Panamera.By now, everybody has seen just how quick the Tesla is in a straight line with Ludicrous mode engaged. You can probably guess the Mercedes and BMW are the underdogs here, with the only real competition to the P100D being the Panamera. The video, however, has something of a surprise in store so sit back, hit play, and enjoy this epic four-door straight-line sprint. Watch Tesla Model 3 Take On Porsche GT2 RS In Epic Race: Video Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 6, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Watch Tesla Model 3 Performance Beat Ford Mustang GT: 40-100 MPH It’s gasoline versus hybrid and electric in this super sedan showdown.Carwow is at it again. The UK-based car site loves to drag race and we’ll give credit where credit is due; they get some seriously quick machines lined up for straight-line sprints. The latest adventure is a full-on luxury sedan showdown where 625 horsepower (466 kilowatts) is the least powerful machine in the group. Oh, what great times we live in.More Racing Source: Electric Vehicle News Watch Tesla Model X 100D Race 510-HP Audi TT-RS: Videolast_img read more

Autistic teens who are bullied have higher rates of depression

first_imgJun 19 2018Teenagers with difficulties in social communication, including autism have higher rates of depressive symptoms, especially if they are being bullied.Researchers at the University of Bristol, using questionnaire, clinic and genetic information on 6091 young people from the Children of the 90s longitudinal study, found that children with autism and those with autistic traits had more symptoms of depression when they were 10 years old than their peers and that this continued at least up to the age of 18.Children with difficulties in social communication were also more likely to have a diagnosis of depression at 18 and the findings suggest an increased risk for those who suffered from bullying. The researchers did not find any link between having higher genetic tendencies towards autism and depressive symptoms.Dr Dheeraj Rai, Consultant Senior Lecturer in Psychiatry at the Centre for Academic Mental Health said: “We still know very little about why mental health problems are common in autism and what could be done to address them.”Thanks to the wealth of data collected within the Children of the 90s study, we tracked the development of depressive symptoms in children with autism and autistic features up to the age of 18 years.”We found that these children have more depressive symptoms than their peers at age 10 and these continue through adolescence to age 18, especially in children who reported being bullied.”More research needs to be done to understand other pathways contributing to the risk of depression in autism across the life course, but these findings suggest that focusing on the role of traumatic experiences such as bullying and interventions targeting these, could be important and may have the potential to make a real difference to the wellbeing of autistic people.”Related StoriesPerinatal depression screenings may overlook women having suicidal ideationPesticide exposure may increase risk of depression in adolescentsStudy finds depression and anxiety symptoms among many asylum seekersAlan Emond, Professor of Child Health at the Centre for Child and Adolescent Health at the University of Bristol added: “Bullying can be detrimental to anyone’s mental health, but young people with social communication difficulties and other autistic traits seem to be particularly vulnerable. To protect autistic children and young people a whole school approach is needed to prevent bullying, coupled with targeted support for vulnerable individuals.”Dr James Cusack, Director of Science at Autistica, the charity for autism research, said: “Autistic people and families have told us that mental health is their top priority for research. This is not surprising as we know autistic people experience high rates of chronic mental health problems which lead to tragically high rates of suicide. Yet, our knowledge of autism and depression has remained poor.”This excellent study tells us that symptoms of depression are elevated in autistic adolescents. The authors found that it was bullying rather than genetic differences which drove an increase in depressive symptoms in autistic people.”We now urgently need to carefully understand bullying and other traumatic experiences in autistic people as we’re now finding they can have a devastating impact.”As the UK’s autism research charity, we will be working hard to ensure that further research on priority areas like this is supported. If we can improve the mental health of autistic people we can go a long way to ensuring they can live the long, healthy, happy life they deserve.” Source:http://www.bristol.ac.uk/last_img read more

Study highlights growing problem of iPad neck among young adults and women

first_imgJun 21 2018Is your iPad being a literal pain in the neck?The answer is likely yes -; especially if you’re a young adult or a woman. “iPad neck” -; persistent pain in the neck and upper shoulders caused by slouching or bending into extreme positions while using tablet computers -; is a growing problem among Americans, according to a new UNLV study. Findings, released last week in The Journal of Physical Therapy Science, show: Sit with in a chair with back support. “And perhaps that’s something for building planners to think about: Installing benches or other chairs without back support invites people to crunch down with iPads in their laps, contributing to posture-related pain problems,” Lee said. Those with a history of neck and shoulder pain reported experiencing more neck and shoulder symptoms during tablet computer use. The condition is more prevalent among young adults than older adults. Use a posture reminder device. Also known as “posture trainers” or “posture coaches,” these small, wearable devices adhere directly to the skin or clip on to clothing and beep to let you know when you’re slouching. Exercise to strengthen neck and shoulder muscles. This is particularly important for women who experience neck and shoulder pain. Sitting without back support (This increased odds of pain by over two times) Related StoriesAre Chronic Pain Relief Drugs for Children Effective?Engineered stem cells offer new treatment for metastatic bone cancerSleep quality and fatigue among women with premature ovarian insufficiencyFlexing the neck forward for long periods of time can put pressure on the spine, causing neck and shoulder muscle strain and pain.Researchers found that the group of university students, staff, and alumni they studied reported a higher prevalence of neck and shoulder pain than the general population -; likely attributed to posture and sedentary behavior commonly observed among people in a university setting. Researchers noted that students especially are less likely to have a dedicated work space while on the go so might sit in uncomfortable postures such as slouched cross-legged on the floor when studying on their tablet computers.Still, only 46 percent of respondents said they’d stop using the device when experiencing discomfort.Regarding gender differences, 70 percent of female respondents reported experiencing symptoms compared to just under 30 percent of men. Interestingly, women were also more likely (77 percent) to use their tablets while sitting on the floor than men (23 percent).The pain disparity among genders might be explained by size and movement differences. According to the researchers, women’s tendency to have lower muscle strength and smaller stature (for example: shorter arms and narrow shoulders) might lead them to assume extreme neck and shoulder postures while typing.Preventing iPad NeckLee offered these tips: UNLV physical therapy professor Szu-Ping Lee, lead author of the study, said the results concern him, especially given the growing popularity of tablet computers, e-book readers, and other connected devices for personal, school, and business purposes.”Such high prevalence of neck and shoulder symptoms, especially among the younger populations, presents a substantial burden to society,” he said.”We were able to quantify exactly how frequent those problems are and what common factors contribute to them,” Lee said. The top risk factor was surprising. “Theoretically, the more hours you spend bent over an iPad, the more neck and shoulder pain you experience -; but what we found is that time is not the most important risk factor. Rather, it’s gender and specific postures.”UNLV -; in conjunction with researchers from hospitals and physical therapy centers across Southern Nevada -; conducted a survey of 412 public university students, staff, faculty, and alumni (135 men and 275 women) who are touchscreen tablet computer users about their device usage habits and neck/shoulder complaints. (No word on how many of those surveyed completed the questionnaire on an iPad.)The most frequently reported symptoms were stiffness, soreness, or aching pain in the neck, upper back/shoulder, arms/hands, or head. Most (55 percent) reported moderate discomfort, but 10 percent said their symptoms were severe and 15 percent said it affected their sleep.Postures that led to pain included those that cause the tablet user to “slump” over and gaze downward:center_img Sitting with the device in the lap Women were 2.059 times more likely to experience musculoskeletal symptoms during iPad use than men. “iPad neck,” sometimes called “tablet neck,” is usually associated with sitting without back support, such as on a bench or on the ground, or slumping over the tablet while it rests in the user’s lap. Other postures significantly associated with pain included using tablets while lying on the side or back. Take a stand. Place your iPad on a stand (rather than a flat surface) and attach a keyboard in order to achieve a more upright posture when using your tablet. Sitting in a chair with the tablet placed on a flat desk surface “Using these electronic devices is becoming a part of our modern lives,” Lee said. “In order to reduce the risk of developing long-term neck and shoulder problems, we need to think about how technology like tablet computer affects human ergonomics and posture.” Source:https://www.unlv.edu/news/release/what-pain-ipad-neck-plagues-women-morelast_img read more

Innovative robotic system helps in removing large colorectal lesions without surgery

first_img Source:https://nyulangone.org/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 7 2018Each year, an estimated 140,000 individuals in the U.S. are diagnosed with colorectal cancer, a malignancy that often develops from a benign polyp into cancer over time. Screening by colonoscopy allows for the detection and removal of polyps, and therefore aids both the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancers. However, when colorectal polyps or other lesions are too large or difficult to remove by colonoscopy, surgery is required. Now, an innovative new option is available: a robotic scope that enables the physician to successfully remove lesions that cannot be removed by endoscopy without the patient undergoing surgery.Through a collaboration between the Division of Colorectal Surgery and the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, physicians at NYU Langone Health were the first in New York to use the Flex® Robotic System within the gastrointestinal tract. Together, colorectal surgeon Mitchell Bernstein, MD, chief of the Division of Colorectal Surgery, and gastroenterologist Seth A. Gross, MD, removed a large, premalignant rectal lesion in a woman who was later discharged on the same day.”This is the first time a robotic platform was incorporated into gastrointestinal endoscopy,” says Dr. Gross, also an associate professor of Medicine at NYU School of Medicine. “At a time when technology and advancement in endoscopy is rapidly improving, our Division is committed to studying and utilizing the best technologies available to care for patients.”Patients with large lesions-; whether benign, premalignant, or potentially malignant– in the GI tract often undergo surgery to remove the diseased anatomy. The robotic platform combines the principles of both endoscopy and minimally invasive surgery for luminal gastrointestinal procedures.Related StoriesNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryScientists discover how resistance to the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil arisesGender biases are extremely common among health care professionals”As surgeons, we continually strive to enhance our techniques, to provide better results for our patients while minimizing complications, decreasing pain, and speeding up recovery,” said Dr. Bernstein, also an associate professor of Surgery at NYU School of Medicine. “As a proponent of minimally invasive and robotic surgery, I appreciate the value of technology that treats disease without creating a traditional incision, thereby reducing scarring, recovery time, and risk of infection, while enhancing patient experience.”How the Medrobotics® Flex® Robotic System WorksDuring the procedure, a flexible robotic scope is inserted into the anus under general anesthesia. The physician advances the endoscope, which contains a high-definition, 3D camera, to the site of the lesion by using a robotic console. Once in position, the scope creates a stable surgical platform through which flexible instruments can pass. Physicians remove the lesion without making any cuts through a patient’s skin.The Flex®Robotic System has been widely recognized for advances in robotic technology, including Best-in-Show at the 2016 Medical Design Excellence Awards (MDEA) and a Best New Product at the 2017 Edison Awards.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration cleared the Medrobotics® Flex® Robotic System for colorectal application in the anus, rectum and distal colon in May 2017. The procedure is covered by most private insurance plans and Medicare. Drs. Bernstein and Gross have no disclosure of any commercial interest or financial support from Medrobotics®.last_img read more

A 100year study of artificial intelligence Microsoft Researchs Eric Horvitz explains

first_imgIt’s challenging enough to sustain any scientific study for a decade. Now Eric Horvitz, managing director of the Microsoft Research lab in Redmond, Washington, is launching a project he wants to last a century. The One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence (AI100), based at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, and funded by Horvitz and his wife, aims to track the impact of artificial intelligence (AI) on all aspects of life, from national security to public psychology and privacy. Horvitz recently helped create a standing committee of interdisciplinary researchers who serve rotating terms, to convene study panels that will produce a major report every 5 years. The first report is expected at the end of this year.ScienceInsider recently caught up with Horvitz to discuss the ambitious project. (Horvitz has chaired the section on information, computing, and communication for AAAS, the publisher of ScienceInsider). This interview has been edited for clarity and brevity. Q: AI100 is a continuation of a 2008 to 2009 study on the short- and long-term implications of AI that you commissioned when you were president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence. Why extend the study to 100 years?A: Machine intelligence will have deep effects on people and society, and the influences will be changing over time. It would be really nice to have a platform where there’s a long vision to the future as well as a really sharp connected memory through sets of studies. For example, when it comes to understanding the relationship of machine intelligence and privacy, we are already seeing science that uses innocuous data like search logs and tweets to make predictions about the likelihood of somebody being at higher risks for certain illnesses. These kinds of things need to be studied.Q: This is an ambitious project both in its length and its breadth—you outlined 18 areas of focus, ranging from the political and economic implications of AI to legal and ethical concerns. How do you plan to structure and sustain it?A: The goal is to set up a system with an initial standing committee that will do a great job at self-sustaining and continuing a chain of these standing committees and study panels over 100 years. You can imagine how certain topics might become strong forerunners in different decades. For example, ethical issues with the automation of key high-stakes decisions might come to the fore sometime in the next decade, when we might have more autonomous cars on the roads and automated systems being used in warfare. I think it will be interesting for these panels to look back at what [earlier panels] addressed and had forecast, what guidance [they] provided, and how it all went. One hundred years can seem like a long time, but a lot can happen in 100 years of technology. Imagine [we were planning on] tracking how the rise of electricity might change the world from 1900 on.Q: Could technological development outpace these 5-year studies?A: I think the studies will be ahead of the wave. It’s not just studying and writing about phenomena, but also about playing the role of soothsayer and providing guidance to government agencies, funding agencies, and researchers—on both the costs and opportunities of AI. For example, in health care, we’ve built systems than can be very valuable for enhancing the delivery of health care while reducing costs. Yet there’s been such sluggish translation of these advances into the real world. You can imagine a focused study on these challenges of translation that could provide recommendations and guidance to the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. You can also imagine that government committees might call and say: “Hey, we need urgent research on X because of what we see with A, B, and C.” It’s a chance to, on a clock, have a reflection about a set of important issues when it comes to machine intelligence.Q: Public attitudes about AI seem to be an important focus of your study. How do you plan to communicate the findings? Do you hope to change public opinion?A: It’s not clear what public attitudes are on machine intelligence. I think many people really enjoy the fruits of systems like search engines without even thinking that they are AI. We’ve also seen, in the last year, luminaries like Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk talking in the press about how AI will threaten humanity someday. To many researchers, these kinds of scares are unfounded. Others are uncertain, and some share concerns. Either way, we need to address them and make sure that people understand that there are practical things that can be done to make sure that things go well as we build and deploy these intelligences.As scientists, we do need to work on making sure that concerns are addressed about the safety and autonomy of AI systems and understand how to avoid or disprove some of these dystopian visions of the future by asking the questions scientifically: Are these outcomes that some people fear possible? And, if possible, how can we make sure they don’t happen by being proactive?Q: Personally, what’s your vision for the future of AI?A: My own view is that AI will be incredibly empowering to humanity. It will help solve problems, it will help us do better science, it promises to really help with challenges in education, health care, and hunger. I think there are lots of opportunities there on the upside. In many ways, some of the concerns that I’ve had over the years have been more about what I call the rough edges that can be addressed. I’m very optimistic about machine intelligence, and I see a need for studying and guiding its influences on people and society, and for continuing dialogue with the public.*Update, 9 January, 11:33 a.m.: This article was revised to clarify and expand several of Horvitz’s comments. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Future western US megadroughts could be worse than ever

first_imgSAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA—The sandstone ruins of Chaco Canyon, New Mexico—a once thriving settlement abandoned in the 13th century by the ancient Pueblo peoples during a 60-year-long “megadrought”—serve as a silent reminder that when water supplies dwindle, even sophisticated societies may not be able to adapt. Now, new research presented today at the AAAS (which publishes Science) meeting here, and published in this week’s issue of Science Advances, suggests that the decades-long megadroughts that hit the southwestern and midwestern United States over the past millennium may have been a mere preview of droughts to come as a result of climate change. The study’s analyses of projected soil moisture over the next 100 years, based on 17 state-of-the art climate models, bolster previous research suggesting that droughts will intensify as the climate warms. And when compared with a 1000-year reconstruction of past droughts based on more than 1800 tree-ring chronologies collected across the continent, droughts forecast by nearly every one of those models are “unprecedented,” even  if CO2 emissions are dramatically reduced, researchers say. Under a “business-as-usual” emissions scenario, they add, there’s an 80% likelihood that at least one decades-long megadrought will hit the regions between 2050 and 2100.Check out our full coverage of the AAAS annual meeting.What message would you send into space? Tell us on Twitter and Vine with #msgtospace!last_img read more

From James Taylor to Taylor Swift Music evolves like biological organisms

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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe In the early 1990s, rap took over the radio: Songs by Snoop Dogg and Jay Z played everywhere. Was this a musical revolution or merely the result of a gradual change in tastes over time? Researchers say they’re now able to answer such questions, thanks to the largest data-driven study of pop music ever undertaken. Applying evolutionary theory to this data set, they say, could settle several debates that have raged over pop music for decades.Among art forms, music seems particularly well suited to data-driven analysis. After all, the features that distinguish one piece of music from another—rhythm, harmony, melody—are intrinsically mathematical. Researchers have long wanted to study the evolution of music with the same rigorous tools that biologists use to study the evolution of species. But tangled copyright protections make it difficult to access musical data sets on a large scale, because even data mining of musical recordings may not be allowed without permission. And determining a representative sample of musical culture for a particular place and time is challenging. For example, even though we have millions of musical scores from the Baroque era, we have no idea how often any of them were actually performed.To solve the sampling problem, a team led by Matthias Mauch, a computer scientist at the Queen Mary University of London, turned to the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, the American music industry’s weekly list of popular singles. The researchers scraped data from the Billboard website, collecting the titles and artists for some 17,000 songs that made the list between 1960 and 2010. Getting the actual song recordings was the trickier problem. Luckily, Mauch used to work at the British online music recommendation service Last.fm, and he knew the company had a vast database of 30-second music samples that it used to preview its wares. Those samples turned out to be large enough to power a massive comparative analysis.Rather than relying on human judgment to compare songs, the team used a statistical technique that extracts features of the recordings like timbre and harmony before grouping them into clusters. To make sure the clusters were meaningful, the researchers compared them with groups of songs created by Last.fm’s millions of users. For example, users put songs by Snoop Dogg, Ludacris, and Jay Z together in the “rap and hip hop” category. But using just the timbre and harmony features, the computer clustered them into nearly identical groups. Encouraged by the similarity, the team then analyzed these massive data with an evolutionary analysis, treating the statistical traits shared among songs like biological traits.Far from becoming formulaic and homogeneous, as some critics have argued, pop music is as diverse now as it has ever been, the researchers found. And it didn’t evolve gradually. Instead, the analysis revealed several dramatic revolutions. The first was in 1964 during the rise of rock and soul music, when bands such as the Beatles drew huge crowds. The next started in 1983 with disco, new wave, and hard rock. And the most recent, and by far the most transformative, started in 1991 with the explosion in rap and hip hop. As Mauch and his team conclude today in Royal Society Open Science, rap is “the single most important event that has shaped the musical structure of the American charts over the past 50 years.” Its powerful influence on the structure of pop music continues today; the occasional rap interlude now finds its way into many a rock song, for example.”This is rigorous,” says Jean-Baptiste Michel, a data scientist at Harvard University and Palantir Technologies, which is headquartered in Palo Alto, California, who was lead author of a 2010 Science paper that kicked off the study of culture through massive data sets. “More researchers need to take this approach.” One of the findings that stands out, he says, is that pop music shows a pattern from biological evolution known as punctuated equilibrium, in which periods of gradual change are separated by explosions of complexity. The most famous example in geological history is the Cambrian explosion, a sudden, massive increase in biodiversity in the fossil record 542 million years ago. “There are differences, of course,” he says, “since biological evolution has the direct parent-offspring relationship, and we don’t know the mechanisms even in biology. So we have to be careful.”(Credit for linked PDF: M. Mauch et al., Royal Society Open Science [2015])center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emaillast_img read more

Tiny changes in Earths gravitational field could help predict tsunamis size

first_img When a massive earthquake struck Japan in 2011, it created a tsunami that killed thousands. But seismologists didn’t have a sense of the quake’s true magnitude for hours—and by that time, the immense wave had already inundated many areas (shown). Now, researchers have come up with a way to more quickly gauge a big quake’s magnitude and thus provide faster, more accurate tsunami warnings: by measuring the miniscule changes in Earth’s gravitational field that are generated when massive slabs of the planet’s crust shift by dozens of meters over the course of a few minutes. The signals generated by the magnitude-9.1 quake that struck Japan were barely one-billionth g, the amount of Earth’s gravitational field at sea level, but they traveled at the speed of light and were detected at seismometers hundreds of kilometers away, the researchers report today in Science. In fact, the team notes, the best measurements of these so-called elastogravity signals can be made by instruments between 1000 and 2000 kilometers away. That’s because at seismometers closer to a massive quake’s epicenter, the slowly moving vibrations of typical seismic waves often arrive at instruments before Earth’s tectonic slabs have stopped shifting, thus masking the signals generated by the temblor’s final spasms. If the scientists’ approach had been available in 2011, they suggest, the quake’s true magnitude could have been estimated within minutes rather than hours. Quakes smaller than magnitude 8 probably don’t generate elastogravity signals large enough to be measured by current instruments, but such temblors are also not as prone to trigger large tsunamis, the researchers note. Tiny changes in Earth’s gravitational field could help predict tsunami’s size Hideo Kurihara/Alamy Stock Photo center_img By Sid PerkinsNov. 30, 2017 , 2:00 PMlast_img read more

Are happy lab animals better for science

first_img Are happy lab animals better for science? Mice and rats have traditionally been housed in relatively barren cages, with only food, water, and basic bedding material. But advocates hope that enriching their environment with objects for play, exercise, and shelter will give the animals a better life—and make them better research models. Fully enriched mouse cage Food pile 1 Running wheel Email 2 Igloo V. ALTOUNIAN/SCIENCE Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A place to hide isimportant, especiallyas mice may viewpeople as predators. 4 Wood logs Garner and others are pushing scientists to enrich the lives of the creatures in their care by giving them toys, companions, and opportunities to exercise and explore—in short, a life more like they would have in the wild. These proponents are driven by both a concern for the welfare of lab animals and a desire to make their contributions to research more meaningful. And they’re beginning to conduct experiments that show that such enrichments not only benefit animals, but science as well.However, other researchers fear that adding extras to animal cages could muddy experiments and exacerbate the reproducibility crisis. And given the tens of millions of rodents and fish in U.S. labs alone, they blanch at the cost. “There’s nothing natural about what we’re doing, and adding a few tubes to a cage is not going to change that,” says Jonathan Godbout, a neuroscientist at The Ohio State University (OSU) in Columbus who studies aging and stress in mice. “The more we spend on this stuff, the less research we can do.” (One to five) 3 Tube maze Mouse capacity Persuading the doubters will take time, in part because money for studies is scarce. The National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, doesn’t support enrichment research because it doesn’t directly relate to the health and well-being of humans, says Patricia Brown, director of the agency’s Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare. “We would if we could,” she says. “A happy mouse is a better model.”The REAL program gets the vast share of its financing from UM funds designed to improve animal care and use, and a few small organizations offer grants for such work. Hannan’s seminal Huntington study came out of his own pocket. “We never could have gotten a grant to do it,” he says, “so we just did it.”Still, the chorus for enrichment is growing. “More and more, people are reaching out to us,” Lofgren says. “We’re starting to see some real momentum.” More than 160 papers were published on rodent enrichment in 2016 versus a handful at the turn of the millennium; at the 2016 meeting of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, 83 out of 171 rodent presentations focused on enrichment—more than twice the number at the 2009 meeting.Meanwhile, REAL continues to explore what makes animals happy. Lofgren plans to line the walls of UM’s sheep runs with photos of contented sheep, for example, because studies suggest that the animals recognize each others’ faces. She and her fellow enrichment advocates hope that one day, work like this will be become the rule, rather than the exception, both for the sake of science and for the animals themselves. “We owe it to these creatures to give them the best lives possible,” Lofgren says. “They’re giving us the best they can. So we should be doing the best we can.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A mouse at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor is transferred from cage to cage in a tube, rather than being hoisted by its tail—a common, but stressful maneuver. AUSTIN THOMASON/MICHIGAN PHOTOGRAPHY Furry test tubesLaboratory animals didn’t always live such a barren lifestyle. Researchers began breeding rats for scientific experiments in the mid-1800s, and early cages allowed the rodents to burrow and run on wheels. But by the 1960s, in an effort to standardize care and limit variables, labs began to prioritize small, cheap, and sterile enclosures. There was little regard for the animals’ natural habits, as long as they were free of obvious pain and suffering. The goal, in essence, was to create furry test tubes.Today, lab mice live in shoebox-size cages hundreds of thousands of times smaller than their natural ranges, and rats can’t forage or even stand upright. Both spend their days blasted by ventilation and bright fluorescent lighting that disrupts their day-night cycles. “We’re doing the exact opposite of what we should be doing to make these animals happy,” Garner says. Lab animals tend to be obese, have weak immune systems, and develop cancer—all before scientists do any experiments on them.The first hints that enrichment could help came in the 1940s. In 1947, psychologist Donald Hebb found that rats he raised with his daughters and gave free rein in his home were better learners than lab-raised rodents. In the 1960s, researchers showed that lab rats provided with wooden blocks and a rotating assortment of mazes developed larger sensory regions of their brains.Yet the only enclosures that changed were those of nonhuman primates. Amendments to the U.S. Animal Welfare Act in 1985 required labs to promote the psychological well-being of the monkeys and chimpanzees in their care, giving them more space, toys, and comrades. The U.S. National Research Council’s 1996 Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals went further, prompting animal care staff to add perches, blankets to make nests, and even music and movies. But rodents and fish were largely ignored.Then, in 2000, neuroscientist Anthony Hannan at the University of Melbourne in Australia decided to spice up the lives of his lab mice. Inspired by research that showed enrichment could spark the growth of new neurons, he provided the rodents with cardboard for making nests, brightly colored balls for play, and ladders and ropes to climb. Remarkably, the animals were much slower to develop symptoms of a Huntington-like disease than their counterparts in standard housing—the first demonstration that enrichment could significantly influence neurological disorders.”Before we did this work, everyone thought Huntington’s was 100% genetic,” says Hannan, whose team has gone on to show similar results in rodent models of autism, depression, and Alzheimer’s disease. AUSTIN THOMASON/MICHIGAN PHOTOGRAPHY Such objectsmay remindmice of nature. Water Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Across campus, she and her team are also trying to improve the lives of rabbits. In a fancy, heavily glassed building once owned by biotech giant Pfizer sits a room filled with 50 white bunnies in metal cages the size of large laundry baskets. Most are housed alone, as has been the standard for decades.”The going theory is that you can’t socially house rabbits, because they’ll tear each other apart,” says Lofgren, even though the animals live in teeming warrens in the wild. For the past few years, her group has been getting some animals to share cages by providing enrichment: hay-filled paper bags they can “forage” through, plastic keys to gnaw on, and other accoutrements. “Now, they’re playing together and snuggling up with each other,” she says.Once they’ve firmed up the enrichments, Lofgren and colleagues will explore how they affect research results. These animals are used in studies of cardiovascular disease, and isolated rabbits sometimes have irregular circadian rhythms, which can influence heart rate, blood pressure, and hormone levels. “We want to study the impact of diet and drugs on atherosclerosis, not the impact of these other variables,” says Patrick Lester, the vet in charge of the rabbits. “If we can eliminate them, we can create a cleaner signal.”The bunnies don’t appreciate every addition, and there’s an easy way to tell. “They’ll pee on it, and shove it into a corner,” Lofgren says. Enrichments that the animals like are added to a database that REAL shares across campus and with other labs, including those in the United States that house some 150,000 rabbits. Lofgren says a recent webinar on their rabbit work attracted 90 institutions. “They get back in touch and say, ‘Oh my gosh, it actually worked!’”Other labs are forging their own paths. At the University of Minho in Braga, Portugal, animal facility manager Magda João Castelhano Carlos has helped develop PhenoWorld, a sort of McMansion for rats with exercise rooms fitted with running wheels, dining areas with food and water, and experimental spaces with levers for cognition testing. The rodents must learn how to open the tunnels that lead to each room, giving them daily challenges. The animals engage in more natural play behavior, Carlos says, and are better models for psychiatric disorders because they’re not unnaturally depressed or anxious.Similarly, some rats at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, can stand, climb ladders, and burrow in real soil in four-level cages created by biologist Daniel Weary and postdoc Joanna Makowska. “Our dream,” Weary says, “is that our animals live a better life with us than if they had never been born.”Despite the boon to animals, some worry that when it comes to research, such enrichments could do more harm than good.Boon or bust for science?A case in point is a strategy pioneered by Lofgren’s group to ease a major trauma in the life of a lab mouse. Imagine a giant reaching into your house every week, hoisting you up by your legs, and plopping you into a new home. That’s what the lab mice in a room stacked with nearly 900 cages on UM’s medical campus deal with every time staff pick them up to clean their enclosures. “It’s one of the most stressful things you can do to them,” Lofgren says.To ease that stress, her group adds plastic tubes to some cages. The goal is to get the rodents accustomed to the tubes and to spending time in them. Then, when cleaning time comes, the animal care staff wait for the mice to enter the tubes (or gently nudge them in), and transfer the whole shebang to a new enclosure. If it works, Lofgren says her team will apply the practice across campus. (15–20) A fish at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor gets to choose between an empty tank and one filled with marbles. Mouse capacity Building a bettermouse house We owe it to these creatures to give them the best lives possible. They’re giving us the best they can. So we should be doing the best we can. Conventional mouse cage In the past decade, a growing body of work has suggested that rodents and other animals have complex mental lives and can experience a range of emotions once only attributed to people. Scientists have learned more about the power of enrichment, too. In 2010, cancer biologist Lei Cao—inspired by a family member who had died of cancer—wondered whether she could combat it by looking beyond drugs or genes. Her team at OSU created a 1-square-meter enclosure filled with so many mazes, running wheels, and bright red, blue, and orange igloos that her daughter dubbed it “Disneyland for Mice.”When injected with cancer cells, animals housed there developed tumors 80% smaller than those in control mice, or no tumors at all. Cao even discovered a possible mechanism: A stimulating environment seemed to activate the brain’s hypothalamus, which regulates hormones that affect everything from mood to cancer proliferation. “We showed that there’s a hard science behind enrichment,” she says. “You can’t just treat the body—you have to treat the mind.”Such findings fit with what we know about how we ourselves respond to our environment. Stress, depression, and lack of social support can boost the risk of cancer in people, and less active individuals are more likely to develop diseases like Huntington later in life.In the past few years, a host of other studies has demonstrated the power of enrichment. Giving rodents and other animals toys, exercise, and companions appears to reduce their susceptibility to epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and addiction. Research published last year showed that enrichment helps mice fight infections and sharpens rats’ memories.The growing literature inspired the National Research Council to update its guide in 2011. Like similar guidelines in Europe, it states that all naturally social species should be socially housed if possible, and advocates enrichment for all lab animals, not just nonhuman primates.Yet scientists can avoid these guidelines if they successfully argue that enrichment will compromise their studies, and universities vary in how they apply enrichment. Showing that enrichment produces happier, healthier lab animals is, after all, not the same as demonstrating that it yields better science. Some researchers want more evidence that enrichment boosts the quality of experimental results.”My mind could be changed by good science,” Godbout says. “If someone comes out with clear-cut data that enrichment impacts the kind of work we do, then of course we’d follow it.”That’s what efforts like the fish experiment at UM are trying to provide.Putting enrichment to the testBack in the aquatic suites, veterinarian Jennifer Lofgren is peering into a zebrafish tank. There’s a transparent plastic divider in the middle, with a hole to swim through. On one side is an enrichment—multicolored marbles lining the bottom—while the other side is empty. The idea is to see where fish spend more time, and thus which enrichment, if any, they prefer. “We can’t just throw random objects like treasure chests in there because we think it looks cool,” Lofgren says. “We want to put some science behind it.”That’s the goal of the university’s Refinement & Enrichment Advances Laboratory (REAL), an unusual program Lofgren co-founded in 2014. REAL’s team of vets and animal care technicians aims to “understand the lived experience of the animal,” she says, and to nurture what it has evolved to do. The marbles, for example, might reduce the fish’s anxiety by making the tank feel a bit more like the wild. (They’re also easier to clean than gravel.)Stress can affect a wide range of physiologies and behaviors, and researchers are beginning to test whether the additions make the animals better models for depression—and, in the case of these particular fish—retinal regeneration. “If we provide subpar welfare,” Lofgren says, “we are also providing subpar science.” ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN—If they weren’t in the windowless basement of a cavernous biomedical research building, the “Aquatic Suites” might sound like a cushy vacation destination. But the zebrafish here at the University of Michigan (UM) still have it pretty good. In a large room full of aquaria, the striped, pinkie-size swimmers flit past fake green plants, white plastic tunnels, and multicolored marbles that may remind them of the bottoms of lakes and streams. These simple accoutrements are a luxury for creatures typically housed with little more than food and the water they swim in. And the enrichments may make the animals better at what they do: serving as important models for human disease.For decades, lab animals such as rodents and fish have lived in barren enclosures: a small plastic box, few—if any—companions, and little else. The smaller the number of variables, the thinking went, the greater the accuracy of the experiment. But a growing number of studies suggests that this approach may have backfired. Only one in nine drugs that works in animals ever succeeds in human clinical trials, and labs often struggle to reproduce one another’s results. Could the environment these creatures live in be part of the problem?That’s what a new group of advocates argues. “We’re trying to control these animals so much, they’re no longer useful,” says Joseph Garner, a behavioral scientist who runs a program to improve the value and welfare of lab animals at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. “If we want animals to tell us about stuff that’s going to happen in people, we need to treat them more like people.” Corn cob bedding Mazes appearto boost rodentcognition. AUSTIN THOMASON/MICHIGAN PHOTOGRAPHY By David GrimmFeb. 7, 2018 , 12:00 PM But there’s no free lunch here: With 49,000 mouse cages at the university, the kinder, gentler cleaning would add considerable expense. The 49,000 tubes would have to be sterilized, and cleaning each cage could take up to 10 times longer.Such numbers concern some scientists, including Godbout. “If you’re paying $1 per cage now, and then suddenly it’s $2 per cage, how do you afford that,” he asks, “especially when our budgets are not keeping pace?”Godbout and others also worry that far from improving research, enrichment could compromise it. If a lab is studying the impact of stress on the growth of new neurons, for example, and then it lets mice exercise on a running wheel—which has been shown to spark neuron growth—the study could be jeopardized, Godbout says. And if every lab uses a different enrichment, it could complicate the ability to reproduce another lab’s experiments, and thus add to, not fix, the reproducibility crisis.What’s more, says John Crabbe, a behavioral geneticist at the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Oregon who researches alcoholism in mice, just because an enrichment works for one type of disorder doesn’t mean it should be applied to all. “If you show it works in tumor studies, I have no trouble with it being the guideline for tumor studies,” he says. “But don’t generalize it to psychiatric disease.”Godbout says he’s all for giving lab animals the best life possible, but he argues that—in a world where they get as much food as they want and don’t have to worry about being eaten by predators—they’re already living a good life. “You don’t need an amusement park to keep them happy.”Hannan acknowledges that enrichment can make studies more expensive. But he argues that the strategy would lead to better studies more likely to translate to human health, saving time and money in the long run. “Less research could be done,” he says, “but it would be better research.” Jennifer Lofgren, University of Michigan Good exercise,and rodents seemto enjoy it. Transferring mice from cage to cage in a tube may be less stressful for them than picking them up by their tails.last_img read more

Before Uncle Sam the Symbol of the United States was the Goddess

first_imgThe capital of the United States is the “District of Columbia.” The capital city of South Carolina is Columbia. One of the most prestigious and oldest American universities is Columbia. One of the biggest movie companies in America is called Columbia. Have you ever stopped to ask yourself why? Who or what is this “Columbia” and why is our capital named after it? From the late 1700s to the early 1900s, the United States was mostly symbolized not by “Uncle Sam” nor the Statue of Liberty. Uncle Sam was not developed as a story/symbol until the end of the War of 1812 and did not become really popular until WWI.J. M. Flagg’s 1917 poster was based on the original British Lord Kitchener poster of three years earlier. It was used to recruit soldiers for both World War I and World War II. Flagg used a modified version of his own face for Uncle Sam, and veteran Walter Botts provided the pose.The Statue of Liberty was not dedicated until 1886. Of course, America has been symbolized by the Bald Eagle since 1782, but though the great bird fills in for America in a lot of ads, propaganda and other media, but a bird is not a “personification,” is it?Low angle view of Statue Of Liberty in Liberty Island, New York City, NY, USA.It may surprise you, but from pre-colonial times until WWI, the most popular personification of the American colonies/the United States was a woman – specifically, a goddess. Her name is Columbia, and she has a distinctly Roman look about her.This should not come as a surprise. For centuries, Europeans had looked back to the Roman Republic/Empire as a symbol of glory, unity, order, and believe it or not – peace. Rome was both the epitome of warrior culture and the enforcer of peace and unity. Nations that could successfully integrate Roman symbols into their national identity lent themselves an air of stability, glory, and power.Carte de visite c. 1866, featuring a woman dressed as Columbia and a man dressed as a Revolutionary War general.The Byzantine Empire was also called the “Eastern Roman Empire,” though its capital was at Constantinople (today’s Istanbul). Although for much of its history the Byzantines spoke and wrote Greek under the rule of Greek emperors, the government and military were Roman, and the empire was looked upon as the continuation of the Roman Empire.The Christian “Holy Roman Empire” begun under Charlemagne also borrowed much of its authority from Rome. The Pope is sometimes known as the “Vicar of Rome.” Latin is still the official language of the Catholic Church. Nations all over the world, especially in the West, have used Roman architecture and statuary as a template for their own buildings and monuments.Columbia at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. Photo by MartinRe CC BY-SA 3.0In colonial and post-colonial times, the two European nations that America had the closest relationship to were Great Britain and France – sometimes for better, sometimes for worse. The Romans called Great Britain “Britannia” after its native Britons and centuries afterward, one of the symbols of the British Isles was a goddess-like figure with the same name. One of the most well-known patriotic songs in the world is “Rule, Britannia.”Personification of Columbia, from a Columbia Records phonograph cylinder package.After the French Revolution, when most French wanted to throw off all vestiges of the Old Regime, another Roman goddess rose up. This was “Marianne”– she was the symbol not just of France, but of the French Republic (which leaned heavily on Roman ideas of government), and the personification of the revolutionary ideals of Liberty Equality and Brotherhood.Bust of Marianne sculpted by Théodore Doriot, in the French Senate. Photo by Super sapin CC BY-SA 3.0Marianne was sometimes symbolized as a goddess, but also took on the appearance of “normal” French women to illustrate the notion that government derived its consent from the governed. Marianne is most often seen wearing a Phrygian cap — a red sock-like hat that takes its name a Greek (not a Roman) province. The Phrygian cap was seen as a representation of democratic government, and the polar opposite of the crowns worn by the French monarchy.6 World famous landmarks that are hiding something from the publicAmerica, being a new country, was based in the main not only by European culture but also by European ideas (including those of the French Enlightenment – which had its roots in ancient Rome). When George Washington went into retirement after the Revolutionary War (instead of becoming “king,” like some wished), he was called the “American Cincinnatus,” after the Roman Republican general who voluntarily gave up power in the 5th Century BC. He was again given this nickname after he walked away from the presidency after two terms, laying down power when he could have kept it.Columbia wearing a warship bearing the words ‘World Power’ as her bonnet (cover of Puck, April 6, 1901).The American continent was referred to as Columbia as far back as George III. The name is part of a language trend taking place at the time — “New Latin,” in which many European languages attached Latin endings or Latin sounds to words and places. Again, this was meant to lend them an air of authenticity, authority and age.Columbia with U.S. flag.France was also sometimes represented or referred to as “Gallia,” Switzerland is known as”Helvetia,” Ireland “Hibernia,” Scotland “Caledonia.” Portugal and Germany also have “Latin” alter egos: “Lusitania” and “Germania,” respectively. The Americas having been “discovered” by Columbus – the area became known poetically as “Columbia.” This also happened in the case of Amerigo Vespucci, the Italian map-maker whose first name became “America.”Personified Columbia in American flag gown and Phrygian cap, which signifies freedom and the pursuit of liberty, from a World War I patriotic poster.Columbia the symbol is most often seen dressed in a Roman toga, with a wreath of olive branches, or, in a bow to Enlightenment ideals, a Phrygian cap. Sometimes her toga is decorated in the colors of the American flag, but sometimes it is white – to represent “purity.”In political cartoons, paintings and drawings, Columbia might be seen in ragged or dirty clothes to symbolize a tough time that American is going through – and the dirt is sometimes on her gown to illustrate a particularly corrupt theme or era.Political cartoon from 1860 depicting Stephen A. Douglas receiving a spanking from Columbia as Uncle Sam looks on approvinglyIn times of war, Columbia was seen with a torn gown, and perhaps a “Captain America” type shield. During war, she was almost always seen with a broadsword in hand, one arm extended forward to exhort the U.S. population to great effort and sacrifice.In this role, she is often depicted as an ancient “Fury,” one of the ancient goddesses of punishment and retribution. Likewise, she is depicted as a Fury in political or social cartoons about correcting an injustice.After the Civil War and the Spanish-American War, Columbia was seen as a mother, welcoming her returning troops with open arms and affection. She also assumed this role in political cartoons if she was protecting the innocent or helpless, such as poor children, abused workers or immigrants.A defiant Columbia in an 1871 Thomas Nast cartoon, shown protecting a defenseless Chinese man from an angry Irish lynch mob that has just burned down an orphanage.At times of great national prosperity and/or pride, Columbia is seen as a shining white-clad beautiful goddess on a mountaintop. This is the symbol of Columbia Pictures.By the time of WWI, Columbia was used along with Uncle Sam to raise money, encourage men to draft and raise interest in all sorts of other wartime necessities. However, though she and Sam were victorious in WWI, by the 1920s Columbia had sort of faded out as a national symbol, supplanted by the more masculine and industrious Uncle Sam, and the figure of the Statue of Liberty. (Though “Lady Liberty” has much in common with Columbia, she is not the same representation.)Read another story from us: Woman who uncovered racism as reason for Japanese internment in U.S. diesIn the first part of the 20th century, American culture was changing. Women were getting the vote, and taking up some more traditional male occupations. An ideal, highly feminized figure was not what women wanted – this is much the reason why Rosie the Riveter of WWII fame was not Columbia in overalls, but a normal everyday woman – doing what was previously considered “mans work.”Matthew Gaskill holds an MA in European History and writes on a variety of topics from the Medieval World to WWII to genealogy and more. A former educator, he values curiosity and diligent research. He is the author of many best-selling Kindle works on Amazon.last_img read more

In undecided Congress first open call for Priyanka She should be party

first_img After Masood Azhar blacklisting, ICJ verdict in Kulbhushan case isolates Pakistan More Explained Jharkhand court drops ‘donate Quran’ condition for bail to Ranchi woman over offensive post Taking stock of monsoon rain In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief This push for Priyanka, however, comes at a time when senior leaders fear that she may not have the kind of acceptability in the party that her brother still has. (File)With its senior leadership unable to arrive at a consensus on Rahul Gandhi’s replacement, the Congress Working Committee (CWC) is unlikely to meet this week to appoint a new party president. But amid the chaos and uncertainty, a murmur is now gaining ground in the party for AICC general secretary Priyanka Gandhi Vadra to take charge. “In fact, they are demanding. It is not reaching the appropriate place. But everybody wants it. Along with her, a credible team should be there, and we should deliver. I strongly feel that if Rahul Gandhi does not take back his resignation, Priyanka ji should become (party chief) and the party should propose her name,” Das told The Indian Express.This push for Priyanka, however, comes at a time when senior leaders fear that she may not have the kind of acceptability in the party that her brother still has. Sources said many leaders did not take kindly to her uncharitable remarks at the CWC meeting in May.Party leaders said that during the meeting, while leaders were trying to convince Rahul to not quit in a hurry, Priyanka said that those who “murdered” the party were sitting in the room. This, they said, was the reason why slogans, such as “Priyanka lao, Congress bachao”, had not been raised.Also Read | Congress: 2014 polls should be basis of seat-sharing talks Related News Sabka saath Amid speculation over several candidates, he said the post should not be one that “has no value”. “It should have a positive, constructive value from the political point of view. And who possesses that quality… to some extent, Jyotiraditya Scindia. Young people see him as a potential person. And to some extent, Sachin Pilot. There are other hardworking people in the field. But they are yet to be identified,” Das said.“Priyanka ji joined the Congress and took up the responsibility, and there was hope among people. People responded throughout India. In my view, Rahul Gandhi should not have resigned. Because we had no other option than him. What the BJP wanted is to isolate the Gandhi brand. To get rid of the Modi brand, the Gandhi brand is needed,” he said. ‘Truth, justice have prevailed’: PM Modi on Kulbhushan Jadhav verdict Advertising Congress leaders have, so far, not pushed her name openly because Rahul Gandhi, while conveying his decision to step down at the CWC meeting on May 25, had said that the party should find someone other than a member of the Gandhi family for the post.“But many people are saying now. I, too, believe Priyankaji should become the Congress president. She belongs to the Gandhi family. She is a leader and has the quality to lead the party. She is dynamic,” former Union minister Sriprakash Jaiswal told The Indian Express.Three-time former Lok Sabha MP Bhakta Charan Das said “millions of leaders of the Congress party, from grassroots to the top, will demand Priyanka ji in the absence of Rahul Gandhi”. Advertising BJP will make Maharashtra Congress-mukt, says party state chief Chandrakant Patil 80 Comment(s) Best Of Express Congress renews bid for all-party Opposition alliance for Maharashtra assembly polls Written by Manoj C G | New Delhi | Updated: July 17, 2019 12:28:47 pm Asked why Priyanka’s name had not come up publicly so far, Jaiswal said: “It (her name) will come up. In my view, she would be a good option. Rahul ji had said non-Gandhi…maybe, that is why people are hesitating to say it openly.”Party sources, meanwhile, said a meeting of the CWC is unlikely this week. In the event of a consensus still proving elusive, sources said the CWC may consider accepting Rahul’s resignation and opt for internal elections to pick a replacement. At the same, they said, it may empower the party’s general secretaries and state in-charges to take decisions during the interim period.Many leaders, however, are of the view that it is time the party gets its act together. “Enough delay has happened. We should find a leader who is acceptable to everyone. And the leader should have a positive imprint in the minds of every worker and voter. Age should also be a factor. Age and popularity both. The next Congress president should not be very old. And that person should be hardworking just like Rahul Gandhi was,” Das said.Opinion | With Rahul Gandhi’s resignation, there is a big question mark over who is in charge of the Congresslast_img read more

Google Hasnt Kept Promise to Stop BubbleWrapping Users Report

first_imgPossible Solutions – click image to enlarge – Richard Adhikari has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2008. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, mobile technologies, CRM, databases, software development, mainframe and mid-range computing, and application development. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including Information Week and Computerworld. He is the author of two books on client/server technology. Email Richard. Search results can change over time, with the inclusion of time-sensitive links, for example. That factor was controlled for by having everyone search at the same time.Location can impact search results — by including local news articles, for example. To control for that, DuckDuckGo manually checked all links, comparing them to the volunteer’s city and state, and replacing all of them with the same placeholder — “localdomain.com” for organic links and “local source” for infoboxes.So, if two users’ results differed only by a different local domain in the same slot, that would not count as different. However, the adjustment did not significantly affect overall variation, DuckDuckGo found.The study’s methodology and conclusions are flawed, because they are based on the assumption that any difference in search results is based on personalization, which is not true, Google told 9to5Google.Time and location are among the factors that can lead to slight differences, and the DuckDuckGo study does not appear to have controlled for those two factors effectively, Google argued.”The study seems to account for time and location fairly well by [using] a common domain,” Constellation’s Wang said. DuckDuckGo “did a reasonable job.” DuckDuckGo looked only at websites’ top-level domains.To count variants of results, DuckDuckGo noted the order of the major elements: the organic (regular) links, the news (top stories) infobox, and the videos infobox. It ignored ads, sections containing related searches, and other infoboxes.Results from mobile devices were excluded when variations were counted because there can be significant variations in the number of infoboxes displayed by mobile and desktop devices.Google search results typically have 10 organic links, but, in private browsing mode, logged out of Google and with local domains replaced with “localdomain.com,” DuckDuckGo found the following:”Gun Control”: 19 different domains; “Immigration”: 15 different domains; and “Vaccinations”: 22 different domains. “Some people were shown a very unusual set of results relative to the other participants — offered some domains seen by no one else,” DuckDuckGo’s Davis said.”If you were one of these people, you would have no way of knowing what you’re missing,” he pointed out. Different Strokes for Different Folks – click image to enlarge – Privacy? What Privacy? Google hasn’t released consumers from its filter bubble — the package of personalized search results it delivers — despite having promised to do so, according to study results DuckDuckGo released Tuesday.DuckDuckGo’s findings:Most participants saw results unique to them, which could not be explained by changes in location, time, by being logged into Google, or by Google testing algorithm changes with a small subset of users; On the first page of search results, Google included links for some participants that it did not include for others, even when logged out and in private browsing mode; Results within the news and videos in-boxes varied significantly. Participants were shown different sources, even after accounting for location; and Private browsing mode and being logged out of Google offered very little filter bubble protection. The problem is “particularly pernicious when searching for political topics,” Davis said.If undecided voters get biased information when conducting research on political topics, the search engine manipulation effect can shift the voting preferences of undecided voters by at least 20 percent.”The issue with filter bubbles is that we live in an echo chamber, which means we only see, hear and act on what we prefer to,” observed Ray Wang, principal analyst at Constellation Research.”We never address the hard issues,” he told TechNewsWorld.The tradeoff is personalization and convenience, Wang said.”Most folks want things tailored and customized to their needs. Advertisers want to make money on clicks. So it continues.” Bing rolls social results into its search results. Amazon uses Bing for its FireOS devices, and its own A9 search engine for products.DuckDuckGo focused on Google because “Google is the monopoly provider for search by a landslide, with over 90 percent market share worldwide, and more than 95 percent in many countries,” said DuckDuckGo Community Manager Daniel Davis.”As such, we focused on them to start, though we would love to see further research in this area,” he told TechNewsWorld.Although DuckDuckGo is a Google competitor, “their arguments stand scrutiny,” said Jon von Tetzchner, CEO of Vivaldi.”Anyone that does a search comparison will see that for themselves,” he told TechNewsWorld.Vivaldi earlier this year became the first browser to enable DuckDuckGo as the default search engine in its Private Windows. Questions of Time and Place Most people saw results customized for them.In private browsing mode, logged out, a search for “gun control” resulted in 62 variations, and 52 of 76 participants saw unique results. In normal mode, 58 variations were served up, and 45 of the 76 participants saw unique results; In private browsing mode, logged out, a search for “immigration” resulted in 57 variations, with 43 of 76 participants seeing unique results. In normal mode, there were nine variations, with unique results for 48 of 76 participants; In private browsing mode, logged out, a search for “vaccinations” returned 73 variations, with unique results for 70 of 76 participants. In normal mode, there were 73 variations, with 70 of 76 participants seeing unique results. For DuckDuckGo’s study, 87 volunteers across the United States searched Google on June 24, 2018, at 9 p.m. ET, using identical search terms.Seventy-six of them used desktops and the remaining 11 used mobile devices.They first searched in private browsing (incognito) mode while logged out of Google, then in normal mode.The data is available for download in two parts: basic non-identifiable participant data, and raw data from the search results.The code DuckDuckGo wrote to analyze the data is open source and available on its GitHub repository. Participants did not see the same results in private browsing mode. When randomly comparing people’s private modes to each other, there was more than double the variation than when comparing the private mode and normal mode results for the same individual, DuckDuckGo noted.This shows that Google tailors search results regardless of browsing mode, DuckDuckGo warned.However, “there is a slight possibility that the algorithm may be doing this and Google has not accounted for unintentional bias,” Wang suggested.”I believe Google is trying to provide the best possible search results, and that this is an unintended consequence of that work,” Vivaldi’s von Tetzchner said. Google “should offer an unfiltered and unbiased search results page that is easily accessible, such as when logged out, in incognito mode, or with the ‘Do Not Track’ browser setting turned on,” DuckDuckGo’s Davis suggested. “We currently offer such unfiltered search results for all users regardless of their browser configuration.”Collecting data helps Google show consumers targeted ads, but “we show advertising based on individual search terms,” Davis noted. “We’ve been profitable since 2014, and it’s possible to thrive as a business without collecting or storing personal data.”Consumers should “use non-Google products” and reduce their digital footprint as much as possible, he suggested.”I use mostly Firefox and DuckDuckGo because of the privacy aspects,” Constellation’s Wang said.Search engines should provide an “absolute” mode, he suggested, which is “what everyone sees instead of what your customized mode may look like.” DuckDuckGo’s Methodslast_img read more

Researchers to explore sex differences in cardiovascular and renal physiology

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 26 2018A person’s sex can be a defining factor in how well–or how poorly–they respond to disease, therapy and recovery. Experts at the forefront of sex-specific research will convene next week at the sixth APS conference on sex differences in cardiovascular and renal physiology. The Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference will be held September 30-October 3 in Knoxville, Tenn.”Sex can increase the risk of certain problems while reducing the risk of others. Yet, despite its impact on health and disease, it has not always been a factor taken into account in the design or execution of research experiments or clinical trials,” said conference co-organizer Jennifer Sullivan, PhD, a professor at Augusta University in Georgia. “That tide is changing. More investigators are now including both sexes in their studies and are performing research that is powered to find sex differences if they exist.””The research landscape sets the stage for an exciting meeting focused on the exploration and expansion of the unique considerations of cardiovascular, renal and metabolic physiology of males versus females,” said conference co-organizer Michael Ryan, PhD, a professor at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. “Including sex differences in research helps scientists draw a clearer picture of the real, significant differences that exist between men and women. These differences can affect normal physiology, disease development and progression and response to both known and yet-to-be-discovered treatments.”Research presented at the meeting will cover health concerns in which biological sex may play a role including diabetes, obesity, stroke, heart attack, hypertension and chronic kidney disease. Presented research will also explore the role of sex hormones–such as estrogen and testosterone–and their effects on cardiovascular, renal and metabolic health.Program HighlightsMonday, October 1 Welcome and Introduction Conference Chairs: Jennifer Sullivan, Augusta University; Michael Ryan, University of Mississippi Medical CenterRelated StoriesBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaArtificial intelligence can help accurately predict acute kidney injury in burn patientsSession 1: Sex and gender differences in physiology and function: The brain and nervous system Chairs: Gina Yosten, St. Louis University School of Medicine; Taylor Schlotman, U.S. Army Institute of Surgical ResearchSession 2: Physiology and gender: Aging and senescence Chairs: Christopher DeSouza, University of Colorado; Jennifer DuPont, Tufts Medical Center Session 3: Sex and gender differences in physiology and function: The heart Chairs: Zdenka Pausova, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto; Eli Louwagie, University of South Dakota-Sanford School of MedicineTuesday, October 2 Session 4: Physiology and gender: Obesity and metabolism Chairs: Franck Mauvais-Jarvis, Tulane University; Jessica Faulkner, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta UniversitySession 5: Sex and gender differences in physiology and function: The kidney Chairs: David Pollock, University of Alabama at Birmingham; Ellen Gillis, Augusta UniversitySession 6: Female-specific cardiovascular, renal and metabolic complications Chairs: Jennifer Sasser, University of Mississippi Medical Center; Dennis Pollow Jr., University of Arizona Wednesday, October 3 Session 7: Sex and gender differences in physiology and function: The vasculature Chairs: Eric Belin de Chantemele, Augusta University; Eman Y. Gohar, University of Alabama at Birmingham Session 8: Male-specific cardiovascular, renal and metabolic complications Chairs: Jane Reckelhoff, University of Mississippi Medical Center; Teri Hreha, Washington University Source:http://www.the-aps.org/last_img read more

Patients report troubling health issues even up to two years after arthroscopic

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 29 2018Up to two years following elective, arthroscopic hip surgery, a substantial proportion of patients reported troubling new health issues ranging from sleep problems, to arthritis to cardiovascular disease.While such problems can be transient and diminish as full mobility returns, the findings suggest that patients and doctors should be prepared to manage a variety of complications over time, even as the surgeries themselves are considered a success.”Our study focused on a younger group — current and former military personnel ages 18-50 — and compared their medical records both before and after surgery,” said Daniel Rhon, D.Sc., an adjunct professor at the Duke Clinical Research Institute and lead author of a study published online Sept. 28 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.”Even among this younger group, the number and frequency of these hidden complications that arose after elective hip surgery suggests we should be taking a more wholistic approach, proactively assessing patients for risks other than the standard surgical complications we more commonly look for,” Rhon said.Related StoriesSleep quality and fatigue among women with premature ovarian insufficiencyMultiple breaches of injection safety practices identified in New Jersey septic arthritis outbreakTransobturator sling surgery shows promise for stress urinary incontinenceRhon and colleague — including senior author Chad Cook, Ph.D., program director of Duke’s Doctor of Physical Therapy Program — conducted the observational study by examining Military Health System records of 1,870 former and current service members undergoing arthroscopic hip surgery between 2004-2013. Patient records were collected for the 12 months prior to and 24 months after surgery.In their analysis, they identified incidences of mental health disorders, chronic pain, substance abuse issues, cardiovascular ailments, metabolic syndrome, arthritis and sleep problems that were noted in the patients’ medical records both before and after their elective hip surgeries.Post-surgery incidences of all comorbidities after the procedure rose dramatically: mental health disorder increased 84 percent; chronic pain diagnoses soared 166 percent; substance abuse ticked up 57 percent; cardiovascular disorders rose 71 percent; metabolic syndrome cases rose 86 percent; arthritis spiked 132 percent; and sleep disorders jumped 111 percent.”Hip arthoscopy is becoming more common even among younger people, and it can be quite successful in resolving chronic, painful conditions,” Cook said. “But it’s important to be prepared for a lengthy recovery. These are surgeries where people are prohibited from fully bearing weight for several weeks, so they can’t exercise, they can’t sleep comfortably, they are in pain.”Rhon said disruptions in sleep can be particularly problematic. Without proper rest, the sense of pain escalates, leading to a negative spiral of fatigue and pain that then depresses mood, energy levels and general health.”These issues are compounding on each other,” Rhon said. “Our study serves as an important alert to both doctors and patients. Armed with this knowledge, we can be vigilant in addressing these problems earlier and potentially stopping others from developing.”Source: https://corporate.dukehealth.org/news-listing/hidden-health-problems-can-appear-two-years-after-elective-hip-surgeries?h=nllast_img read more