Margaret Mary Health conducts community health assessment

first_imgBatesville, IN—Margaret Mary Health is once again sponsoring a phone survey to identify community health needs in Ripley and Franklin counties. Over the next few weeks, the firm, Professional Research Consultants, Inc., will be calling area residents to ask questions about their health habits and lifestyles. The results of the survey will be combined into a community report and used to help develop strategies to address the identified needs. Survey participants will be randomly selected and all responses will be kept confidential.“We encourage everyone to participate if they’re called,” said Geralyn Litzinger, Margaret Mary’s Community Health Director. “This survey is used to help us better understand our community and any unmet healthcare needs. What we learn from the results truly impacts what we do for the community’s benefit moving forward. Margaret Mary has used prior report findings to provide better healthcare services in the area including improved access to care, food and nutrition services and support for addictions and substance abuse.”For more information about the community health assessment survey, call Geralyn Litzinger at 812.933.5145.last_img read more

With Legends Classic title, Orange finally beginning to live up to early hype

first_img Published on November 29, 2010 at 12:00 pm Comments Jim Boeheim wanted to answer one last question. There were things left unsaid.Seated at the Boardwalk Hall podium, he scanned the assembled press in Atlantic City, N.J., for any further inquiries about his team’s Legends Classic championship. He would make sure everything was cleared up, even if he and the press were told — urged — by a tournament employee that the press conference was over.With the one final question, he cleared the air about Syracuse’s performance through six games. He attempted to do it after he was asked about his comments after Syracuse’s second game, when he called the Orange ‘overrated.’ Once more he cleared the air about what he meant then and where he feels the team is now.‘I said that (we were overrated) four games ago,’ Boeheim said. ‘I just said what was obvious. Well, when we haven’t played well, we have won. We haven’t played well for five games, and we managed to win the five. Tonight we did play well, and that was the difference.’That was the big difference. With the end of the two-game tournament in Atlantic City, N.J., Boeheim and the Orange players felt SU took strides in playing like a Top 10 team. But more specifically, with the 80-76 victory over Georgia Tech Saturday, Syracuse basked in the first performance of the young season in which SU believed it played up to its talent.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textIt was what was expected out of the Thanksgiving weekend trip. Boeheim and the SU players said it would be the first true test of the year.The No. 8 Orange (6-0) will look to build off that performance Tuesday while hosting fellow 2010 Central New York NCAA Tournament team Cornell (2-4) at 7 p.m. inside the Carrier Dome. The Orange and the Big Red both reached the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Tournament last year, as Cornell lost to No. 1-seeded Kentucky in the Dome.But it’s a game that comes for SU light-years away from the 86-67 win over Canisius on Nov. 14, when Boeheim called the Orange overrated.At the crux of that: After the five games with which Boeheim wasn’t pleased, SU found a rhythm, especially offensively. A successful offense was the paramount step off the two tussles against major conference teams. SU shot 48 percent over the weekend after entering the games shooting 40 percent — and 32.6 percent in first halves.For SU guard Scoop Jardine, Saturday’s win was much simpler, though. It was just that — a win.‘It’s a win, we get better from it,’ Jardine said. ‘We learn from it.’With the matchup against the Big Red, Syracuse will have to learn against a similar inferior opponent like the four SU faced to start the season. Cornell is a shell of the team that last appeared in the Dome. It lost four starters from last year, along with head coach Steve Donahue. The sole returning starter is junior guard Chris Wroblewski, who is averaging a team-high 15.3 points per game.Unlike Cornell, Kris Joseph is professing that this year’s incarnation of SU is a team without just one go-to player. He was happy with the Legends Classic title, calling it a ’10 out of 10′ as SU won the way he expects to win this year. Not by blowing out teams but by playing a physical, balanced, competitive brand of basketball.‘We are going to have to fight till the end,’ Joseph said. ‘And one thing I found out about us is we have a lot of heart. … That’s one thing we are going to need to do throughout the remainder of the year. Keep fighting.’SU fought enough for the win. But after the game, the scene of Boeheim not at the podium but in SU’s locker room hinted at the fact that he said SU still has a ways to go.Void of almost all of the press, Boeheim’s sons smiled and kidded as they coddled the Legends Classic trophy. Around the locker room wall, though, their father slumped in a chair with an entourage of a half-dozen people circling him. He was tired from the weekend.There is more that needs to be done, and he said that.‘This was a tremendous tournament for us,’ he said. ‘But we have certainly got to play better.’aolivero@syr.educenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Jamaican Prime Minister Seeks Regional Solution to Crime

first_imgJamaican Prime Minister Andrew Holness has requested that the issue of violent crime be placed on the agenda of the next Summit of Caribbean leaders to be held in July 2018. He made the request speaking at a news conference following the closure of the 38th meeting of Heads of Governments in Grenada on Thursday night. Holness said while crime and violence had not been a matter on the agenda for this year’s summit, he had taken the opportunity to raise the matter.“I raised the issue from the perspective of not just a security issue. But also but from a macro-social perspective/ the use of violence as a means of resolving conflict, as a means of social control, as part of our social transactions is becoming almost a feature of our societies.”Holness said that regional governments have to take a “proactive role” in addressing crime, and asked CARICOM to place this on the agenda for the July 2018 meeting. He said the other leaders agreed.“I believe that this will start a process within CARICOM to address the issue of violence, particularly violence that ends up in crime,” Holness said.Jamaica and several other Caribbean nations, specifically Trinidad and Tobago, and Guyana have been beset by an onslaught of violent crime in recent times. The crime wave includes murders, aggravated robbery, and sexual assault. There is, however, concern about violent crime evolving within domestic disputes.Increasingly, Caribbean residents in the Diaspora are expressing skepticism to return to their home countries, even for vacations, fearing repercussions from the wave of violent crimes. Also, the Caribbean Diaspora is calling for measures to be taken to reduce violent crime in the region, for the long run.Copyright 2017 – Caribbean National Weekly Newslast_img read more

Authenticity Beats Professionalism in Corporate Twitter World

first_imgA very bad thing happens when companies forget to consider the importance of the social aspect in social media. Is your workplace filled with robotic, monotoned people who take professionalism to an uncomfortable level? Most companies try to avoid creating such a culture for a very specific reason: it thwarts innovation and expression, while stymieing employee development over time. This idea also extends to mediums like Twitter, where a stuffy, boring account can make your brand seem just that, stuffy and boring.What most businesses need to do (and there are rare exceptions here) is represent a more human side of themselves on Twitter and other social platforms. Why? Because if you can’t engage your audience on account of being overly professional, you’ll disenfranchise them.The moral of the story is that, if you believe you’re guilty of not being relatable or another corporate social media sin, you should give up the tired act. Your audience will probably appreciate it. For more information on incorporating your human side into your social media marketing strategy, read the full article by Lisa Barone.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more