Police secure persons of interest names

first_img14-year-old murderAs Police continue their investigation into the murder of Malika Hamilton, 14, whose body was found in a canal at Hope, East Coast Demerara, they have managed to gather a list with the names of males with whom theMurdered: Malika Hamiltonyoung woman was last seen.A senior Police official in C Division told Guyana Times that over the next few days they are expected to interview those on the list with the intention of getting a breakthrough.He also stated that Police are in close contact with the relatives of the deceased teenager as they might also gather information that could help in the probe. The official is also calling on the public to assist, since there are persons who saw the teenager after she left home.To date no one has been arrested.On Friday the post-mortem proved that the teen was strangled and sustained blunt trauma to the head. It is believed that the teenager might have been strangled and struck to the head before she was thrown into the canal.Due to the fact that the post-mortem revealed that she drowned, it means she was alive when she was thrown into the canal.Hamilton of Lot 11 Two Friends Village, ECD, was last seen in the company of two boys; however, the boys reportedly told her family that they dropped her off at a canal in the village, claiming that she wanted to visit her grandmother.Hamilton never showed up and after several calls to family enquiring of her whereabouts, the matter was reported to the Police. The family then launched a search on Monday evening but came up empty handed.The search resumed on Tuesday and it was then the discovery was made. Immediately the body was pulled from the canal, relatives suggested that foul play was involved.They are working closely with the Police to find the perpetrators.last_img read more

MCSP/RHS Close out Event Today

first_imgAn official close out event of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Maternal and Child Survival Program’s Restoration of Health Services (MCSP/RHS) Project will be held today, May 29, at a resort in Monrovia, a release has said.The event will be held in collaboration with the Ministry of Health, USAID and County Health Teams of Grand Bassa, Nimba and Lofa counties as well as partners.It will be hosted under the them,“Restoring Health Services.”According to a release from the event, Minister of Health Dr. Wilhelmina Jallah and USAID Mission Director Dr. Anthony Chan, Chairman of the Senate Standing Committee on Health Senator Peter Coleman, as well as MCSP director Dr. Koki Agarwal and the County Health Teams are expected to make remarks.The RHS Project started in August 2015 and worked in 77 facilities, with 30 in Grand Bassa, 30 in Nimba, and 17 in Lofa. The project worked to improve Infection Prevention and Control practices as well as improving the Quality of Maternal, Newborn and Child Health services.Tuesday’s event will comprise a cultural performance, testimonies from beneficiaries and communities “telling their stories” as well as Ministry of Health, County and District Health teams.During the event, MCSP/RHS will hold an exhibition to showcase selected high impact interventions focusing on Infection Prevention and Control, Monitoring, Evaluation and Research, Waste, Water and Triage upgrades and Maternal, New born and Child Health services.It will also include recognition of best performing health facilities and districts from counties on which the project is focused. The MCSP is a global U.S. Agency for International Development cooperative agreement, to introduce and support high-impact health interventions in 30 countries, with the ultimate goal of preventing child and maternal deaths.The event will take place at 9a.m. to 2p.m.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

‘Child father’ admits killing Sophia woman

first_imgClevon Hamilton, 26, the father of Simone Hackett’s child, has confessed to murdering the young woman, whose body was found in a trench at Cummings Lodge, East Coast Demerara.Murdered: Simone HackettAccording to Crime Chief Wendell Blanhum, the miner who was arrested in Mahdia, Region Eight (Potaro-Siparuni) admitted on Thursday of committing the heinous crime, after which he led a team of investigators to the scene where he murdered Hackett.According to reports received, the man told investigators that he travelled to Georgetown on Saturday and stayed at a city hotel. On Saturday evening, he reportedly contacted Hackett and made arrangements to meet at the University of Guyana access road.He then contacted a close friend who collected him from the hotel and dropped him off at the bus shed where he met the woman.At the time, he was carrying a haversack in which the murder weapon was concealed. The suspect went on to tell the Police that during the meeting, an argument ensued between the two, after he accused Hackett of being unfaithful.The man who also admitted that he was jealous, explained that despite them being separated for some time, he was still in love with her. Added to his jealousy, the man also stated that the woman wanted to take his son away from him; hence he knew he had to get rid of her.Hamilton admitted that during the argument, he choked the woman after which he pulled out the knife and inflicted the fatal injuries. He then toss the body in the trench, got rid of the murder weapon, boarded a taxi and travelled back to Mahdia. He was arrested on Wednesday morning by Police ranks in Mahdia after which he was transported to the city where he was grilled and subsequently caved under pressure, admitting to committing the crime.It was reported that upon discovery of the woman’s body, her throat was slashed and at least three stab wounds were seen on her back. She reportedly left home on Saturday evening at about 20:30h to uplift a package that was sent by her child’s father from Mahdia, but never returned home.She was due to be the maid of honour at her sister’s wedding on Saturday last and she also missed her son’s birthday on Sunday. Relative from the initial stage thought that something was amiss after they telephoned the woman and heard sounds in the background but when they tried to contact her later in the night, the phone went to voicemail.After she did not return home, a missing person’s report was lodged at the Sparandaam Police Station and relatives hysterically began to search for the woman but to no avail. It was until Tuesday, her body was discovered by two school boys who were heading to school.The suspect is expected to be charged in the new week.last_img read more

Job Vacancy: Experienced Assistant Quantity Surveyor required

first_imgA well-established Construction Consultancy firm is seeking an Assistant Quantity Surveyor on a permanent basis.Position: Assistant Quantity SurveyorRequirements: • 1-3 years Quantity Surveying experience.• Degree Qualification in Quantity Surveying.• Proficient with BoQ’s and tendering• Work on own initiative or as part of a team• Fully competent in the use of Cubit/ Buildsoft/ Excel/ Word/ Microsoft Project.• Excellent Verbal and Written Communication.• Commitment & Motivation to join a young exciting company.• Own transport.How to Apply:To apply for this role, please send a CV with QS 101 in the email subject line to donegaldailyjobs@gmail.comJob Vacancy: Experienced Assistant Quantity Surveyor required was last modified: February 11th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Construction Consultancy firmJob VacancyQS jobsQuantity SurveyingQuantity Surveyorlast_img read more

Friends remember Dana

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl eventActor Darryl “Chill” Mitchell, who became paralyzed in a motorcycle accident years ago, said he drew inspiration from the Reeve family. Others who attended included Robert Kennedy Jr., Robin Williams, Lance Armstrong and Matthew Broderick, who said the service was “very emotional.” Barbara Walters, Sen. Hillary Clinton, Oscar-winner Philip Seymour Hoffman and New York Yankees manager Joe Torre were among the celebrities paying tribute to Dana Reeve at the singer-actress’s memorial service Monday. “She had a light within her that was captured by the way people talked about her today, especially her son and stepchildren,” Clinton said after the private service. “She was one of the most exceptional people I have ever known. It was a very fitting tribute.” Reeve died of lung cancer at age 44 on March 6, a year and a half after the death of her husband, “Superman” actor Christopher Reeve. Reeve had devoted herself to her husband’s care and became an activist in the search for a cure for spinal-cord injuries. Will, Reeve’s son, and his half-siblings Matthew and Alexandra, Christopher Reeve’s children, appeared arm in arm outside the New Amsterdam Theatre before the memorial service. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Antelope Valley Calendar

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org or www.sava-na.org. SUNDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host a poltuck and pool party, 1-5:30 p.m. in Lancaster. Host will provide the hot dogs, hamburgers and sodas. Guests should bring a side dish, salad or dessert to share. Call (661) 267-2586 or 945-1217. Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5; students with identification are admitted free. 40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30-10:30 p.m. Sunday at Lancaster Elks Lodge, 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $5 members, $7 nonmembers. Call (661) 949-9467. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5; students with ID admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymouswill meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults ages 17 1/2 to 25 with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Dance Groove will offer ballroom and Latin dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. at Dance Groove Studio, 43631 10th St. W., Lancaster. Cost: $5 per person. Call (661) 948-9101. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12-Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo, 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early-bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early-bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or log on to the Web site at www.sava-na.org. TUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club weekly league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Information and location: Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Business Network International B2 Bombers chapter will meet, 12:15 p.m. at Eduardo’s restaurant, 819 W. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 609-1288 or e-mail audmill@qnet.com. The organization’s Web site is at www.bni-scav.com. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miikcq Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri at (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. WEDNESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club hosts a dinner, 5:30 p.m. at Red Lobster, 1049 Rancho Vista Blvd., Palmdale, outside the Antelope Valley Mall. An option moval follows. Call (661) 267-2586 by Tuesday. Emotional Freedom Technique for pain relief weekly demonstrations, 6:30-7:30 p.m. (except before three-day weekends), Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. Sweet Talkers Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the Wilsona School District boardroom, 18050 E. Ave. 0, Lake Los Angeles. Call (661) 944-1216 or 944-1130. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call (661) 948-5279. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SATURDAY Phun Time Cruisers meet 5 to 7 p.m., Apollo Park, 4555 W. Ave. G. Leona Valley Sertoma Club meets, 8 a.m. the first and third Saturdays of each month at Jackie’s Restaurant, 40352 90th St. W., Leona Valley. Call (661) 270-0339. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. last_img read more

Tehama County Supervisors visited by Sunrise Rotary Roving Jail

first_imgThe Red Bluff Sunrise Rotary Roving Jail, which raises funds for groups such as the California Highway Patrol Explorers, Corning Chamber of Commerce and the Tehama County Library during the 11 Days of Round-Up, stopped in Tuesday to see the Tehama County Board of Supervisors. Pictured are Supervisors Dennis Garton, Bob Williams and Burt Bundy staying out of jail with get out of jail free cards, while Supervisor Steve Chamblin is arrested. Also pictured is Red Bluff CHP Area Commander Lt. Lou …last_img read more

Marvelous un-Darwinian Mammals

first_imgSome familiar and unfamiliar mammals share their secrets of extreme adaptation and survival.The Mongoose that Confounds Conventional WisdomAmericans may only know about the mongoose from Rudyard Kipling’s stories. Now, National Geographic has provided a delightful look at these snake-hunting, sociable, family-oriented mammals of sub-Saharan Africa, with some surprises for evolutionists. Did you know that unrelated adults mentor the young, teaching them the skills they will need?“The same pup will stay with the same adult day after day after day for about two months until the offspring can find its own food,” says Michael Cant, an ecologist at the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus in Wales.How these bonds form is a bit mysterious, but it seems to be “a two-way street,” Cant says. A pup will follow an adult around, and the adult occasionally stops to check that “the right pup” is following. Some pups follow only one adult, while others will follow more than one.Reporter Liz Langley tells a Kipling-like just-so story of her own, speculating that “Escorting may have evolved because learning diverse methods of foraging can reduce competition within the large groups that banded mongooses live in.” Next, however, her expert says that these cute mammals break the rules:Cant has been studying mongooses for 23 years, and says that part of their charm is “they reliably do everything wrong”—confounding conventional wisdom about animal behavior.Camel at AIG petting zoo. Photo by David Coppedge.The Camel Mammal that Enjoys Eating CactusAnother fascinating mammal is the camel. In another National Geographic piece, Elaina Zachos explains “This is How Camels Can Eat Spikey Cacti.” Don’t try this at home; humans lack the specialized hardened palate with tough papillae that allow camels to pull this trick off. A video clip shows how two pet camels named Baby and Nessie do it. “The animals’ tough, flexible lips move over the food, and each half of their split upper lips wiggle independently to get close to the vegetation.”They don’t seem to mind the tough thorns of prickly pear hardly at all; they relish the fleshy leaves so much, they put up with the discomfort that would send us humans to the emergency room. Owner Alex Warnock, an Arizonan fascinated by camels, says, “They just seem to love it.” But do we really need Elaina’s Darwin sermon?Other animals, including humans, have papillae. Ours are positioned under the taste buds on our tongues, but they’re much smaller than those found on camels due to evolutionary adaptations and a different diet. Many fish-eating birds, reptiles, and fish have papillae throughout their gastrointestinal systems, as well.If this were a law of nature, Indians of the desert would have evolved camel lips and papillae to enjoy the same diet of cactus.The Fossil Mammal that Is Not Half-ReptileWhen Fox News Science spread a rumor that “Discovery of ‘reptilian-mammal’ fossil could rewrite history,” Mindy Waisberger at Live Science hastened to issue a correction, “No, This Tiny Beast Is Not Half-Mammal, Half-Reptile (But It’s Still Super Cool).”Cifelliodon (Jorge A. Gonzalez). The mammal stood 3 inches tall and weighed 2.5 pounds.The mammal in question is Cifelliodon wahkarmoosuch. It lived during the Cretaceous period, she says, and belonged to a group that was closely related to mammals. But the artwork looks pretty mammalian.A small, furry animal with a blunt snout and beady eyes scuttled across what is now eastern Utah some 130 million years ago. And while the wee beast was surely unusual and fascinating, there’s one thing it was definitely not: half-mammal and half-reptile.Headlines about the recent find have described it as though it were some bizarre hybrid of reptile and mammal. But while it might be amusing to imagine a beast with the front end of a lizard and the rear end of a rat, it’s not very scientific.With that settled, what makes it “Super Cool”? Waisberger struggles to relate it to reptilian ancestors, saying that this “haramiyidan” was not really a mammal, but was closely related to mammals. To do so, she points to reptilian characteristics it retained, like egg laying. That, however, makes the duck-billed platypus a living fossil. Many of its abilities seem beyond the reach of Darwinian natural selection:In life, the newly described haramiyidan had a long tail, teeth that could slice and crush vegetation and tiny eye sockets that suggested its eyes were small and its vision was poor. However, its olfactory bulbs were unusually large, hinting that it relied heavily on its sense of smell, according to the study.Anyone who has watched Illustra Media’s animation of salmon olfaction in the film Living Waters should immediately conclude that to think olfaction evolved is tantamount to believing in miracles. The rest of the evolutionary claims about this mammal come to a show-stopper at that point alone.Instead of attributing everything to blind evolution, Randy Guliuzza has a better idea. In ICR Acts & Facts this month (June 2018), he continues his series on “engineered adaptability,” explaining how the foresight of intelligent design made animals able to switch on pre-programmed changes that allow conforming to changing environments. “Adaptive changes are purposeful, not random,” Guliuzza explains with examples, logic, and challenges to Darwinism. (Visited 513 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

SA competes at food Olympics

first_imgMaking us proud: The National Culinary Team representing South Africa at the Food Olympics. A scrumpticious beef ensemble by chef Bertus Basson. A desert creation by Candice Philip. A Two onion soup by Henrico Grobbelaar.(Images:saca.co.za)   Khanyi Magubane13 of South Africa’s top chefs will face the tough challenge of titillating the taste buds of judges when they represent the country at the Internationale Kochkunst Ausstellung (IKA) Culinary Olympics in Germany from 19 to 23 October.IKA 2008, as the competition is loosely named, will boast 40 national teams, 90 regional teams, 11 military teams and 2000 chefs and confectioners.Like the traditional Olympics, winners from the different categories will receive gold, silver and bronze medals respectively.Competitors will be expected to demonstrate their superior culinary skills in 20 categories that consist of every aspect of the high-culture of haute cuisine and patisserie (pastry or confectionary).Held every four years, the competition has been in existence for the past 100 years in Germany.It has grown phenomenally from its humble beginnings. It began as a local cooking contest in 1896 at the Frankfurt fairgrounds. Up until 1996, this remained the location for the competition. It then moved to Berlin, and is now currently held in Erfurt.Making South Africa proudThe team representing South Africa at the Olympics has been carefully selected. All the team members have made strides in their careers, which gained them the necessary recognition to compete in the Olympics.Allistaire Lawrence has a broad range of experience that he’s bringing to the team. After completing his studies at the prestigious Institute of Culinary Art in Stellenbosch, he worked at the equally illustrious Village Hotel on the Spier Wine Estate. He is now based in Johannesburg, where he works at the award-winning Roots Restaurant, north of Johannesburg.His experience in international cooking competitions includes participating in the Hans Bueschkens Junior Chefs Challenge in New Zealand in 2006, where he was the reserve. In 2007 Lawrence became a junior member of the National Culinary Team.An experienced chef, Bertus Basson studied in Cape Town, in the Western Cape. After studying, he worked at a variety of restaurants, including the Western Cape Hotel & Spa in Hermanus.In 2005, along with his business partner Craig Cormack, Basson started his own business, All Things Culinary. Last year, Basson’s dream of owning his own restaurant was realised when he opened Overture, based at the Hidden Valley Wines in Stellenbosch, along the Cape wine route.He is a senior member of the national team, having won fourth place in the international Swiss competition Chaine des Rotisseurs Jeune Commis in 2002. The competition was established in 1977 to support young, aspirant chefs to hone their skills.In 2007, he was named the Unilever food solutions senior chef of the year in 2007. He joined Team South Africa in 2003, travelling to the American Culinary Classic in May the same year, where the team won two silver and two bronze medals.Candice Philip had a unique opportunity to work while simultaneously earning her qualification. She was part of an apprentice programme at the events venue Gallagher Estate, where she spent four years. Two and a half years ago she joined the prestigious Saxon Hotel, where she still currently works.Like her team mates, Philip’s track record in culinary competitions is excellent. In 2006, she was placed third at the Chaine des Rotisseurs Jeune Commis competition in 2006. The following year was a busy one for Philip, who won a bronze medal in the Mini Plated Salon Culinaire at Hostex, a South African hospitality and catering exhibition. She also took second place in the Sunday Times Chef of the Year and second place in the Unilever foods solutions senior chef of the year.Perhaps the groups’ most experienced chef, Garth Shnier, is a graduate from the Southern Sun in-house training programme and has worked both locally and internationally, including Germany and the US. He is currently the executive chef at the five-star Michelangelo Hotel.Shnier has been part of South Africa’s National Culinary Team for 14 years and has represented South Africa in no less than eight international individual and team competitions. He has brought home two gold and several silver medals.Cape Town-born Dilene Cranna’s entry into the world of cooking happened quite by chance. Not sure what to study, she enrolled in the first programme her finger landed on at Cape Technikon’s yearbook. Although she initially didn’t like the course, she found her passion in pastry. She has been a member of the national team as a pastry specialist since 2005.No newcomer to culinary competitions, Henrico Grobbelaar also hails from the Cape. Having studied at the South African Culinary Academy in Cape Town, He began his career as a junior chef de partie at Erinvale Estate Hotel, in the Western Cape. He then embarked on an adventure as a senior chef on a private yacht in the USA for six months, which he’s done twice. He is now the owner of Lemon’s Bistro in Somerset West.In January 2005, Grobbelaar won first place in the National Salon Culinaire competition, this attracted the attention of the selectors of the national team.Multi-award winning South African chef Jodi-Ann Palmer graduated from Silwood Kitchen, one of South Africa’s oldest culinary training schools. She has vast work experience, where she has worked with her team members Bertus Basson at his eatery, as well as with Garth Shnier on some of his projects.Her accolades including winning the McCain tribute to good taste at Hostex Cape 2006. In May of that same year, Jodi began work as international new product development and technology chef for Nando’s Chickenland, where she was given free reign to follow her belief.She then relocated to the US, where she worked at the world-renowned restaurant The French Laundry in California. Jodi is a previous winner of the prestigious Unilever Junior Chef of the Year award.The team’s newcomer Samantha Montzinger finished her studies in 2004. She then had the opportunity to work with her mentor Jeff Scheuremanns until 2006. She is currently with Fedics, South Africa’s biggest black-owned outsourced catering company, where she is executive chef and catering manager for their national head office.Described as having a competitive spirit, Montzinger ’s pure dedication, passion and flair stood out to the national team selectors, who chose her to represent South Africa at IKA 2008.Other team members include Marli Robert, Rudi Liebenberg, Trevor Boyd and Vicki Gurovich, all with equally impressive culinary CVs.National recognitionThe National Culinary Team (NCT) consists of 11 distinguished chefs who have set themselves head and shoulders above their contemporaries.For the first time this year, the NCT’s status has been recognised as a South African team.In recognising the team, the Department of Arts and Culture’s Bureau of Heraldry has now officially registered a coat of arms for the team.The coat of arms depicts the classic tools of a chefs’ trade – a spoon and a whisk – as well as the chef’s hat and flames. The emblem also boasts South Africa’s national flower.Beneath the emblem, is a banner with “Masakhane Team SA” inscribed – Masakhane being a Zulu/Xhosa phrase that meaning, “Lets build each other up” or “Stand Together”.“Team SA’s coat of arms is one in which the South African hospitality industry can be proud and which young chefs can aspire to wear as a member of Team South Africa,” said Garth Shnier, the international competitions director for the South African Chefs Association and the manager for team South Africa.Do you have any comments or queries about this article? Email Khanyi Magubane at: Khanyim@mediaclubsouthafrica.com Related storiesSouth African FoodUseful LinksThe South African Chef’s AssociationChefs in South AfricaFedicsThe French LaundryThe Jeunes Commis Rôtisseurs Unileverlast_img read more

Ohio man indicted for cattle-rustling scheme

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine announced that an Ohio man has been indicted for running a scheme in Ohio, Kentucky, and West Virginia where he allegedly purchased over $30,000 worth of livestock and vehicles using fraudulent checks and falsified documents.Brandon White, 28, of Lucasville, was arraigned May 29 after being indicted by a Hocking County grand jury on May 22. The indictment includes 15 counts:Engaging in a pattern of corrupt activity, first degree felonyGrand theft of a motor vehicle, fourth degree felony (two counts)Theft of an elderly person, fourth degree felonyTheft of an elderly person, third degree felonyTheft by deception, fifth degree felony (five counts)Money laundering, third degree felony (two counts)Tampering with records, third degree felony (three counts).White is accused of using fraudulent checks to purchase cattle from farmers who had advertised on Craigslist that they had cattle to sell. When he picked up the animals, he often used a false alias and paid the victim using a check drawn on an account that did not belong to him and had insufficient funds. White then sold the cattle quickly, before the checks bounced. He also is accused of filing false documents and stealing vehicles used to transport the cattle. He allegedly operated under the names B&S Trucking and Livestock LLC and Brandon’s Cattle Company.“We won’t stand by while farmers and other Ohioans are ripped off,” DeWine said. “This defendant is accused of traveling around Ohio and nearby states to steal livestock and vehicles using fraudulent checks and false documents.”The case is being prosecuted by an attorney with the Attorney General’s Economic Crimes Unit. This case was investigated by the Economic Crimes Unit along with the Gallia County Sheriff’s Office, Hocking County Sheriff’s Office, Jackson Township Police, Portsmouth Police, Scioto County Sheriff’s Office, Kenova Police (West Virginia), Mercer County Sheriff’s Office (Kentucky), Wood County Sheriff’s Office (West Virginia), and the Ohio Department of Public Safety.The defendant was convicted in Kentucky on similar charges. He currently is being held in the Southeast Ohio Regional Jail.last_img read more